Archive for the ‘Original Oil Paintings’ Category

Refreshing Oasis

August 8, 2020

Mike and Bea’s anniversary is just around the corner, so I etch their wedding date into the wall of the planter with a brush dipped in a thin oil wash of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Liquin. You may click on the image to see it larger.

UPSIDE DOWN Again! Now the walls of the planters and the tiles along the tops of them are painted over the edge, on to the lower edge of the gallery wrap canvas.

Gladiolus are planted at the base of the wall, next to the Geraniums. These are one of the few flowers that I don’t paint in my regular sequence of FLOWERS FIRST, LEAVES LAST. The flowers grow mostly above the foliage on tall stalks so the long, strap like leaves are painted first. 

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Painting the Gladiolus Flowers.

Nasturtiums nestle at the base of the Glads. The fragrant flowers are blocked in first with mixes of Cadmium Red Light + Alizarin Crimson, Cadmium Red Light + Cadmium Orange and Cadmium Orange. Then the leaves are made with several shades of Pthalo Blue + Cadmium Yellow Medium.

The distinctive round leaves of the Nasturtiums have a dot in the center of them where the stem attaches on the under side.

Heart shaped leaves of the Sweet Potato Vine bring an extra touch of romance to the Anniversary painting. 

The tiny Hummingbird hovers above our curious kitten!

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Painting that precious tiger Kitty.

Yellow Daisies fill the planter in the foreground. The happy flowers are blocked in with mixes of Cadmium Yellow Medium + Cadmium Orange + MUD and Cadmium Yellow Medium. 

After painting the foliage with several different mixes of Pthalo Blue + Cadmium Orange + White, Red centers are added to the Yellow Daisies. Cadmium Red Light is used for those illuminated by the sun, the centers in the shadows are made with Cadmium Red Deep.

Refreshing Oasis

AHHHH…..Sit back, breathe in the fresh ocean air, take a sip of wine and enjoy the magical music of the crashing surf just beyond the terrace of this “Refreshing Oasis”! Your wonderful comments and encouraging words are very appreciated. Thank you for being part of my Team Senkarik Family! With Colorful Smiles and Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

Geraniums and Tile Floor

August 6, 2020

The chair cushions are painted with several mixes of Ultramarine Blue + White.

The upright part of the steps (the riser) is painted darker than the top, flat part. Combinations of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Ultramarine Blue + Cadmium Orange + White are used for the steps.

The lower, curved portion of the tile floor is covered with the same mixes as the upper terrace. Then the lines separating the tiles are drawn into the wet paint.

To continue the floor on the lower edge, the entire unit of canvas and cardboard is taken off the easel and placed, upside down, on the floor next to my easel. You can see how having the canvas attached to the backing cardboard makes it easy to handle the wet painting.

The Geraniums in the distant container are blocked in, FLOWERS FIRST, LEAVES LAST.

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Painting the Geraniums planted under the Pygmy Palms.

A few Geranium petals are allowed to fall to the floor. You may click on this, or any of the other pictures, to see enlargements.

We’ll be doing some more planting in our next session. Why don’t you grab a paint of gardening gloves and come give me a hand! Thank you for following along today. With Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

Big Change Today

August 4, 2020

The beach behind the chair is carefully painted around the scrolls of the wrought iron. Please remember, you may click on any of the pictures to see enlargements.

Next the curly cues of the design are drawn into the wet paint of the sand with a brush dipped in an oil mix of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Liquin. This is much easier to do while the background is fresh, if the underlying paint was dry it would be difficult to make the lines smooth.

The table top is made of White + a touch of Ultramarine Blue and White + a little Cadmium Orange. The Blue mix, which is cooler, is used at the back of the table’s surface to make it recede. Lines separating the tiles are delineated with the same MUD mix as the chair backs and arms.

My collectors asked if I could extend the Bougainvillea all the way to the right so it appeared to go behind the Wisteria. NO PROBLEM!

Now, let’s work on the terra cotta tile terrace. The entire surface is painted first, establishing the shadows and sunlight spilling across the pavers. Several combinations of MUD + Cadmium Orange + a little Pthalo Blue + White and Ultramarine Blue + MUD + White make the floor colors. The cooler mixes are used closest to the back edge. Moving forward the mixes become progressively warmer, or more orange.

Perspective lines, indicating the edges of the tiles, are drawn freehand into the wet paint of the floor with a fine liner brush dipped in the MUD + Liquin mix.

Horizontal lines, separating the individual pavers, are delineated next.

The leading edge of each tile is highlighted. This helps to “lift” the front of the terrace floor.

Getting the floor painted makes a BIG difference! The warm, terra cotta tiles make the blues and aquas of the water appear even more intense! The painting will make another dramatic change when we get all the flowers planted! Hope you’ll keep following along! HUGS,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

 

Wine and Wisteria

July 31, 2020

I love Giant Birds of Paradise, here are some Jack and I planted in the patio garden at our previous home.

The large, broad leaves of these beautiful plants are painted with several mixes of Ptahlo Blue + Cadmium Yellow Medium + a touch of Cadmium Orange. White is added into some of the mixtures to make them lighter. You may click on this or any of the other images to see them larger.

Moving to the bistro table I begin working on the wine glasses. The ocean shows through the upper part of the glasses. Next the wine in the glasses is made with Alizarin Crimson. The illuminated glow that follows the rounded bowl of the glasses, where the sunlight shines through the wine, is Alizarin Crimson + White. The green leaves and bottle accentuate the Red Wine.

The bottle is painted with Sap Green + White. Sunlight glows through the wine in the bottle too!

Wisteria winds up the wall on the right side of the painting. The blossoms are blocked in first with combinations of Dioxazine Purple + White and Dioxazine Purple + Ultramarine Blue + White. Then the leaves are painted around the masses of Lavender, helping to shape the flowers.

Long, twining tendrils are drawn with a fine liner brush. The leaves and tendrils are made of Pthalo Blue + Lemon Yellow + White. Strokes of Pthalo Blue + White are made here and there in the foliage to bring coolness in the depths of the leaves.

Details are added to the delicate, dangling flowers. I have to be very careful applying the individual petals, I don’t want to pick up the underlying greens on my brush and muddy the pretty lavenders.

The gnarled Wisteria trunk is painted with mixes of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Cadmium Orange and MUD + Cadmium Orange + White.

The warmer, more intense colors of the Bougainvillea and Wisteria, as well as the deep greens of the foliage, are making the cool blues of the ocean drop back. We’re already beginning to get the feeling of distance in the painting! I appreciate all of your kind comments. With Cheerful Smiles and Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

Tumbling Bougainvillea

July 29, 2020

My collectors asked if I could intensify the blues in the ocean directly behind the sunlit wave, so I’ve gone ahead and painted that area brighter. Once the foreground is done, the warmth of the satillo tile floor and the oranges, reds and yellows of the flowers will make the water appear even brighter. Now I begin constructing the columns using mixtures of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Cadmium Orange + Cadmium Yellow Medium + a tiny bit of Pthalo Blue + White.

Pygmy Palms are planted in the container placed in the closest archway. Sunlight slips under the arch and dances on the lacy fronds.

Trunks of the Bougainvillea are drawn into the wet paint of the wall with a mix of MUD + Liquin. The twisted vines continue on to the side of the gallery wrap canvas.

The rest of the arches and columns are finished and work begins on the Bougainvillea. Come Watch…..

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Blocking in the Hot Pink Bougainvillea with mixes of Permanent Rose + White and Permanent Rose + Cadmium Red Light + White

Standing on a small step stool enables me to paint the top edge of the gallery wrap canvas without having to reach too high. Painting with your elbow above your shoulder can quickly cause damage to your Rotator Cuff.

The Bougainvillea, tumbling down over the arches, is complete. Thank you for following along, hope you’ll visit my studio again for our next session. With Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

Sunlit Wave

July 27, 2020

We begin painting with the sky because it’s the source of light and influences the color in the entire piece. The upper regions are White + Cobalt Blue. Moving downward the sky is covered with a lighter mix of White + Pthalo Blue. The area nearest the horizon is made with the lightest combination of White + Pthalo Blue + a tiny bit of Cadmium Orange.

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Softening the Line where Sky meets Sea

A crashing wave breaks the horizon line, helping to increase the feeling of depth in our scene. Please remember, you may click on any of the images to see the larger.

The distant rocks are blocked in with combinations of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Cadmium Orange + more Ultramarine Blue + White. Strokes of some of the blues from the water are added into the rocks to make them cooler so they will recede.

The dark part of the ocean is made of several mixes in different proportions of Ultramarine Blue + a little MUD + White. The lightest of these mixtures is dragged over the rocks to give the impression of mist rising up from the crashing surf.

The massive rocks in the foreground are painted with warmer mixes of MUD + Cadmium Orange + a touch of Cadmium Yellow Medium + White. This brings them forward visually following a simple rule: Warm Colors Come Forward, Cool Colors Go Back.

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Painting the Sunlit Wave

A few slabs of rock emerge from the sandy beach here and there. These are painted directly into the wet paint of the water.

The sunlit wave and rocks lining the shore are complete! Thank you for following along today, see you in our next session. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have in the comments section below. With Colorful Smiles,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

Finishing Our Oil Wash Sketch

July 24, 2020

The setting for our flower filled courtyard is the Cote d’Azur on the southern Coast of France. This picture is from FrenchRivieraSecrets.com.

I’m using pictures we took in Pacific Grove, California as reference for the rocks and crashing waves. We lived in this amazing area, which is very similar to the Mediterranean coast of France, in 1999. The roaring surf and fresh ocean air was invigorating.

Morning walks on the beach were a wonderful way to begin our day. Jack and I were very blessed to live in such a beautiful place.

Our collaboration is based on the painting above, “Hidden Oasis”.

The rocks are drawn with the same oil wash as in our previous session, MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Liquin. We discussed making the distant bluffs higher, I have to be careful not to get them too high so they won’t interfere with the Wisteria blossoms draping down. Please keep in mind as you read through my blog, you may click on any of the pictures to view them larger.

We’re also increasing the size of the wave rolling in to the rocky beach. Mike and Bea asked that I paint it with the sunlight shining through the top part of the wave. This is going to be a fun challenge as I’ve not done that before.

Background is all sketched in, now for the surprise elements!

Bea hesitantly asked if I would be agreeable to adding a little kitty and hummingbird. I replied with a resounding YES, I love both! She said I don’t want them to be too obvious, just something people would discover as they look closer at the painting. So our little kitten will be partially hidden in the Daisies and Sweet Potato Vine. Like he’s been nestled down in the flowers but climbed up, putting his front paws on the edge of the planter, to check out who is disturbing his nap.

The zippy intruder is a Ruby Throat Hummingbird. My left hand is braced against the dry part of the canvas, providing a steady support for my right hand as I draw the details of the tiny bird.

The Oil Wash sketch is now complete, we’ll begin painting in our next session. Do come back to watch, I’ll have a VIDEO Demonstration for you! Please BE SAFE! Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

The Oil Wash Sketch

July 23, 2020

The horizon line was first drawn with a brush dipped in a thin oil wash made of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Liquin. The vanishing point for the perspective on the building is on the far right of the horizon line, indicated by the red arrow. Using a 4 foot straight edge a few perspective lines were drawn to use for guides as I begin to sketch the columns. Please remember, you may click on any of the images to view enlargements.

The bases of the columns are drawn first…..

Then the foreground planters, curved walkway and steps are constructed.

The easiest method for me to get the chairs in the proper perspective is to draw the top of the table and the seat cushions first. Guess I’m just weird that way. It’s simpler for me to get the basic circle and rectangle shapes correct. Then I’ll come back later and add the more complicated legs and chair backs to the floating table top and seat cushions.

The tops of the columns and arches are drawn next.

Construction of the building is complete, now I can begin planting. Bougainvillea spills over the open archways while Wisteria drapes down the wall on the right side of the painting.

Let’s add some chairs to hold those comfy seat cushions. The heart shaped wrought iron backs bring a romantic touch to Mike and Bea’s Anniversary Painting.

Red wine in the glasses is washed in with Alizarin Crimson + Liquin. The bottle is Sap Green + Liquin. Some of the Alizarin Crimson wash is applied over the Sap Green on the lower portion of the bottle, to give the impression of the wine that remains. I’ve had many people comment that I certainly put A LOT of detail in my initial oil wash sketch. Jack taught me a long time ago, “Prior Planning Prevents Pitiful Paintings”! And it’s true. By working out the perspective, proportions and placement of elements in the painting before starting to apply opaque oil paint, I don’t have problems later. Believe me, when I haven’t done the detailed sketch on canvas beforehand, it’s been a DISASTER!

Giant Birds of Paradise fill the large containers on either side of the main archway. My reference photo is on the laptop, placed on the taboret to the right of my easel.

Pygmy Palms take up residence in a container under the far left arch. The planter in front of them will be full of Yellow Daises with Red Centers. I’m also planting some Sweet Potato Vine here, the leaves that look like hearts will add more romance to the scene.

Red Geraniums, Orange Nasturtiums and Pink Gladiolus fill the planter at the base of the Wisteria. The tall stems of the Gladiolus will extend up, in front of the chair, helping to give the feeling of depth to the painting.

I’ve compressed two days of sketching into this one post. Still have a little more to do. The ocean, with waves crashing on the rocks, will be in the background. Plus, have a couple of surprises to put it. You’ll just have to come watch the next session to see what they are! With Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

 

Prep for a Gallery Wrap Style Painting

July 22, 2020

I’m beginning a new commission in this session. It’s going to be painted in the Gallery Wrap style with the image extending over, on to the sides of the canvas. My canvas is a Gallery Wrap Canvas, which means it is stretched on 1 1/2 inch wide stretcher bars with the staples on the very back. So the sides are clean and smooth. The canvas was primed with Titanium White Liquitex Basics Acrylic. I also painted a square block on the back surface with the same acrylic. Now both are dry. The canvas is flipped over, hanging wire attached and then I write the Title, Copyright information, Number Code of Authenticity and sign it on the white block with a black Sharpie pen. Years ago Jack came up with the idea of the numbering system. This painting is SG3220. Translated that means SENKARIK (S) painted this in July (G). It’s the 32nd painting I’ve done in the year 2020. The Letters correspond to the month, A for January, B for February, etc. You may click on this or any of the other images to see enlargements.

Next a personalized message, especially for my collectors, is added. The painting is for their 37th Anniversary. Congratulations Mike and Bea!

Red Arrows mark two of the six screw eyes I’ve put in the back of the stretcher bars. There are 2 each on the longer top and bottom bars, 1 each on the shorter sides. The blue tape on the hanging wire contains a wall hanger and nail. I’ve attached two for this painting because it’s a larger piece. Two hangers make it much easier to keep the bigger painting level on the wall.

The canvas is 34 inches by 42 inches. A piece of double ply cardboard that measures 40 inches by 48 inches is placed on the back of the canvas. After making sure the cardboard is centered on the canvas, it’s pushed down so the screw eyes poke through. A nail is pushed through the screw eye to anchor the canvas to the cardboard backing. This is done at all 6 points around the canvas.

1 1/2 inch Blue Painter’s Tape is placed over each nail and screw eye. This will keep the nail securely in place.

The entire unit of Canvas and Cardboard is placed on my easel. You can see how the larger cardboard extends at an equal distance from the edge, all the way around the canvas. This will make it very easy to handle the wet painting without messing up the sides! I’ve taped one of my reference pictures to the cardboard backing. We’ll begin sketching the composition up on the canvas in our next session. Hope you’ll come follow along.

If you would like to receive an email every time I publish a new post please feel free to subscribe to my blog. CLICK THIS LINK and scroll to the upper right side of the page. You will see a heading EMAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS. Just enter your email address and click the button “Sign me up!”  It’s easy. Please keep in mind, to move through the blog when you get the posts just CLICK on the small titles at the top of the page. The right one for the next post or the title on the left side for the previous session. Thank you for subscribing! With Colorful Smiles,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020

The Days of Glory

July 18, 2020

My colors mixes are all prepared to begin painting the Horse. The recipes are as follows: #1. Two thin oil washes of MUD (2 parts Ultramarine Blue + 1 part Alizarin Crimson) + Liquin and Burnt Umber + Liquin. #2. Ptahlo Blue + Cadmium Orange + a tiny touch of MUD + White. #3. Ultramarine Blue + White. #4. Six mixtures in varying combinations of MUD + Burnt Umber + Cadmium Red Light. The two lightest shades directly under the numeral 4 have White added in. #5. White + a bit of Ultramarine Blue + a speck of Cadmium Orange.

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION: Blocking in the Horse’s Head

After completing the head, I begin working down the neck and shoulder of the Horse. The lightest of the #4 mixes is used for the highlights on his gleaming coat. You may click on this or any of the other images to see them larger.

Cool light from the ground reflects up onto the under side of the Horse’s belly. Some of the #3 color is used for this. Adding this cool blue along the edge helps give the feeling of roundness to the Horse’s barrel.

The Mcclellan saddle is painted with combinations of Burnt Umber + Ivory Black + White.

Marshall asked if I could put his First Sergeant’s initials somewhere in the painting. The saddle bag is a perfect spot!

Ultramarine Blue + Ivory Black + White is used for the Cavalry Jacket thrown over the saddle. The stripes and trim are made with Cadmium Yellow Medium + MUD. The highlights are Cadmium Yellow Medium + White.

“The Days of Glory”  10 inches by 10 inches

We’re done! I hope this proud bay will bring Marshall’s First Sergeant many wonderful memories of “The Days of Glory” he spent in the Cavalry and let him know how much his service for our country is appreciated! Thank you for all of your encouraging and supportive comments. My readers are the BEST! With Big Hugs,

Mikki Senkarik signature JPEGALL SENKARIK IMAGES ARE PROTECTED UNDER INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT LAW

© Senkarik 2020